Originally from Ancient India, kabaddi is a popular contact sport in Southern Asia. In the states of Bihar, Telangana, Tamil Nadu, Punjab, and Maharashtra, it is a recognized sport. It is practiced all throughout the nation.

It is a well-liked activity outside of India and is also the national sport of Bangladesh, Iran, and Nepal, where it is taught in all public schools. It is also one of India’s national sports.

The England Kabaddi Federation UK oversees the sport in the United Kingdom, one of the other major locations for Kabaddi in the world where there are Indian and Pakistani populations.

In India, there are numerous regional variations of the sport known as Kabaddi, including the Sanjeevani, Gaminee, Punjabi, and Amar forms, each of which has a unique interpretation of the game’s rules.

In India and other nations, there are also other games that are very similar to Kabaddi but may not be the same game entirely. These games include the Maldives’ Baibalaa, Maharashtra’s Hututu, and Bangladesh’s Hadudu.

The International Kabaddi Federation is the organization in charge of overseeing the game and its regulations all over the world. It is made up of more than 30 national associations.

Let’s find out how to play kabaddi along with rules:

Part 1 –  Setting Up

  1. Play in a flat, rectangular arena 13 meters (42.7 ft) wide x 10 meters (32.8 ft) long.

If you’re just playing a friendly game of men’s Kabaddi with some buddies, your play area doesn’t have to be exactly this size. These are the standard measurements for men’s Kabaddi played professionally. It should be generally rectangular, flat, and open. The court is significantly smaller for women’s Kabaddi, measuring 12 meters (39.4 feet) wide by 8 meters (26.2 feet)                                                                                                                          

  1. Use lines and markings to divide the court appropriately. 

The official court markings for professional Kabaddi are as follows; remember that if you’re playing jokingly with friends, your markings don’t have to be accurate.

  • Delimitation lines: the outlines of the court’s 13 x 10-meter perimeter.
  • Playfield lines: one meter separates each side of the court’s 10-meter boundary lines, which mark a rectangular area that is 13 meters by 8 meters.
  • The court is divided into two 6.5 meters (21.3 feet) by 8 meters halves by the midline. 
  • Balk lines: These lines are 3.75 meters (12.3 feet) on either side of the midline and run parallel to it.
  1. Divide into two teams of seven players each.

Traditionally, each team sends four players to each side of the field, leaving three players in reserve. Some Kabaddi varieties, meanwhile, require all seven players to enter the field simultaneously.

Part 2 – Understanding the Basics

  1. Flip a coin to decide which team will go first.

Any random method is acceptable to determine which team will start the game; examples include rolling the highest possible number of dice, guessing the number a neutral referee is considering, etc.

  1. If your team goes first, send a “raider” across the midline.

Teams take turns sending “raiders” (players) over the midline to the opposing team’s side of the court in the Kabaddi game. Within 30 seconds, the raider must race back to his side while attempting to tag members of the opposing team. If he succeeds, each player he touches awards his team one point.

However, before crossing the midline, the raider must begin shouting “Kabaddi” repeatedly. He or she cannot stop until they cross back over to their team’s side

  1. If your team doesn’t go first, defend!

When your team is being raided, you and the other three players on the field are “anti-raiders” or “stoppers.” Your aim is to prevent the raider from tagging you and returning to the middle line. You can accomplish this by either outrunning him until he stops breathing or by tackling or grabbing him and holding him down.

A raider must not be seized or restrained by his clothing, hair, or any other part of his body than his limbs and torso.

  1. Take turns alternating between raiding and defending.
  • With a five-minute intermission in between each 20-minute half, the two teams rotate between raiding and defending.
  • After halftime, the two teams switch sides of the court.
  • The team with the most points at the end of the game wins!
  1. Send players out when they are tagged, captured, or break a rule.

Players might be temporarily “out” of play in kabaddi for a number of different reasons. Players in reserve may not step in to fill in for them in this scenario because substitutions are only permitted for active players. A player may be sent out under the conditions listed below.

  • Any defending players who are tagged by a raider are eliminated if the raider manages to return to his side.
  • When a raider is captured and unable to cross the midline before losing consciousness, he is out.
  • Any player, whether they are defending or raiding, is eliminated if they walk outside the lines (unless they were purposefully pulled or shoved, in which case the offending player is eliminated).
  1. “Revive” players by getting an opponent out

You have the opportunity to bring back (or “revive”) a member of your team who has previously been ruled out whenever your team eliminates a player from the other squad. Both defending and raiding teams can agree with this. Players are brought back in the same sequence they were taken out, and doing so awards the opposing team a point.

Part 3 – Using Advanced Scoring Rules

  1. Score a “Lona” by knocking out the whole opposing squad. 

A “Lona” (two extra points for that play) is awarded to your team if you can eliminate the whole opposing team at once for any number of factors and none of their players are eligible for rebirth.

This results in the resuscitation of the entire adversarial squad.

  1. Obtain a “super tackle” by capturing your opponent with three or fewer defenders. 

A “super tackle” point is added if your team manages to stop the raider from returning to his side of the court while only having two or fewer players on defense.

You receive two points for the play as a result of this point being added to the point you received for driving the raider out.

  1. When your opponents violate the game’s rules, you gain points.

In most Kabaddi penalties, the opposing side receives one point as a result. The offensive strategies that the opposing side can use to score points are listed below.

  • The raid is over, the defending team earns a point, and they are given the opportunity to raid again if the raider shouts anything other than the pre-approved “Kabbadi” chant while he is conducting the raid (although the raider is not out).
  • The raid is over and the defensive team earns a point in addition to the opportunity to conduct another raid if the raider begins his chant after crossing the midline. However, the raider is still not eliminated in this scenario.
  • A point is awarded to the opposing team and the raid is over if a raider leaves their assigned order.

Kabaddi Rules

The Object of the Game

Simply scoring more points than the opponent team within the allocated time is the game’s main goal. Each team must try to score points by both attacking and defending in order to accomplish this. When launching an attack, the offensive team sends a raider into the defensive team’s half. This raider must touch one or more opponents in order to score a point. In order to stop the raider from getting back to their own half before their breath runs out, you must either wrestle them to the ground or just block their path.

Players & Equipment

There are two teams that each have twelve players, and they play kabaddi. The number of players permitted on the field of play at any given moment is seven for each team. A white line divides the playing area for Kabaddi, which is 13m by 10m, into two halves, with one team in each half. It can be played on a variety of surfaces, including a dedicated clay court and unoccupied land that has been marked out with a playing surface.

Kabaddi, in contrast to a lot of other well-liked sports and games, actually requires no unique gear, attire, or accessories, making it a game that is accessible to everyone.

Scoring

In Kabaddi, scoring is not too difficult. For every opponent they eliminate from the game, teams receive one point. There are various strategies for eliminating an opponent and scoring a point. When attacking, this is accomplished by the raider touching an enemy and knocking them unconscious. When defending, the raider must be kept from entering their own half.

In Kabaddi, there are also bonus points. By successfully touching the bonus line in the opponent’s half, the raider can gain an extra point. A team receives three extra points if all of their opponents are eliminated, and another point is awarded if any portion of an opponent’s body crosses the line.

Winning the Game

The team with the most points is deemed the winner after the game. A game is termed a draw if both sides have the same number of points at the conclusion of play.

Rules of Kabaddi

  • A team can have a maximum of 12 players, however, only 7 of those players can be on the field at once.
  • Due to the physical nature of Kabaddi, age, and weight classifications are used in matches.
  • Each Kabaddi match is overseen by six officials. The officials consist of two umpires, a referee, a scorer, and two assistant scorers.
  • The game lasts two halves of 20 minutes each, including a 5-minute halftime break.
  • Each Kabaddi match starts with a coin flip, and the winner decides whether or not to take on the first raid. The side that did not raid first in the first half of the game will initiate a raid to start the second half.
  • To score a point, a raider must inhale, walk into the opposing team’s half of the field, tag one or more players, and then return to their own half of the field before inhaling again.
  • The defensive team is being raided, and the players must keep the raiders from tagging them and returning over the midway line. A team can get a point by successfully stopping a raider from returning to their own half after tagging them. The defenders can stop the raider by grabbing him/her by limbs only and not by grabbing their hair or clothes.
  • Each team will rotate between raiding and defending. After halftime, the teams traded sides of the court, and the team who played the best defense in the first half launched a raid to open the alternate half. 
  • The team which has more points wins the game and this way the game Kabaddi is played.

Kabaddi Rules

In conclusion, Kabaddi is a well-liked, simple-to-learn team physical game having origins in historic South Asia and India. Two teams of seven players each compete in the game. Players alternately sprint over the center line to the opposing team’s half of the court, tag opponents, and run back. Each Kabaddi match is overseen by six officials, and the game is played on a 13 X 10-meter field. Learn the basic rules of the game, Watch professional matches to acquire a feel for the regulations, and start coming up with your own tactics if you want to become a pro at Kabaddi. 

Players & Equipment

There are two teams that each have twelve players, and they play kabaddi. The number of players permitted on the field of play at any given moment is seven for each team. A white line divides the playing area for Kabaddi, which is 13m by 10m, into two halves, with one team in each half. It can be played on a variety of surfaces, including a dedicated clay court and unoccupied land that has been marked out with a playing surface.

Kabaddi, in contrast to a lot of other well-liked sports and games, actually requires no unique gear, attire, or accessories, making it a game that is accessible to everyone.

Scoring

In Kabaddi, scoring is not too difficult. For every opponent they eliminate from the game, teams receive one point. There are various strategies for eliminating an opponent and scoring a point. When attacking, this is accomplished by the raider touching an enemy and knocking them unconscious. When defending, the raider must be kept from entering their own half.

In Kabaddi, there are also bonus points. By successfully touching the bonus line in the opponent’s half, the raider can gain an extra point. A team receives three extra points if all of their opponents are eliminated, and another point is awarded if any portion of an opponent’s body crosses the line.

Winning the Game

The team with the most points is deemed the winner after the game. A game is termed a draw if both sides have the same number of points at the conclusion of play.

Rules of Kabaddi

  • A team can have a maximum of 12 players, however, only 7 of those players can be on the field at once.
  • Due to the physical nature of Kabaddi, age, and weight classifications are used in matches.
  • Each Kabaddi match is overseen by six officials. The officials consist of two umpires, a referee, a scorer, and two assistant scorers.
  • The game lasts two halves of 20 minutes each, including a 5-minute halftime break.
  • Each Kabaddi match starts with a coin flip, and the winner decides whether or not to take on the first raid. The side that did not raid first in the first half of the game will initiate a raid to start the second half.
  • To score a point, a raider must inhale, walk into the opposing team’s half of the field, tag one or more players, and then return to their own half of the field before inhaling again.
  • The defensive team is being raided, and the players must keep the raiders from tagging them and returning over the midway line. A team can get a point by successfully stopping a raider from returning to their own half after tagging them. The defenders can stop the raider by grabbing him/her by limbs only and not by grabbing their hair or clothes.
  • Each team will rotate between raiding and defending. After halftime, the teams traded sides of the court, and the team who played the best defense in the first half launched a raid to open the alternate half. 
  • The team which has more points wins the game and this way the game Kabaddi is played.

Conclusion

In conclusion, Kabaddi is a well-liked, simple-to-learn team physical game having origins in historic South Asia and India. Two teams of seven players each compete in the game. Players alternately sprint over the center line to the opposing team’s half of the court, tag opponents, and run back. Each Kabaddi match is overseen by six officials, and the game is played on a 13 X 10-meter field. Learn the basic rules of the game, Watch professional matches to acquire a feel for the regulations, and start coming up with your own tactics if you want to become a pro at Kabaddi. 

Also check out Which is the best Kabaddi Team in the World? – Top 10

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